Philipp Masur

New Publication: An Agenda for Open Science in Communication

In the last 10 years, many canonical findings in the social sciences appear unreliable. This so-called “replication crisis” has spurred calls for open science practices, which aim to increase the reproducibility, replicability, and generalizability of findings. Communication research is subject to many of the same challenges that have caused low replicability in other fields. As a result, I recently wrote a paper with more than 30 authors in which we propose an agenda for adopting… Read More »New Publication: An Agenda for Open Science in Communication

The problem of false positives: Antibody tests in times of Corona

A few weeks or months from now, we could have a Covid-19 test kit sent to our home. Similar to a blood sugar test for diabetics, we would prick our finger, wait for a couple of minutes, and we will know whether we are immune or not. The general idea is that this would help in lessen the social distancing restrictions because those who are immune could in principle go back to a normal life.… Read More »The problem of false positives: Antibody tests in times of Corona

Understanding exponential growth: The corona pandemic

With the news going crazy these days, I felt like there is one particularly thing that is often misunderstood. The corona virus spreads exponentially (without intervention or measures). The problem is that we – as human beings – are very bad at imagining what an exponential trend looks like. By now, many differnet graphics and figures appear everywhere that aim to visualize the amount of infections or mortality rates per country. One of the most… Read More »Understanding exponential growth: The corona pandemic

Estimating power for structural equation models: Simulations in R

Computing a priori power analyses for simple statistical models can be done analytically (e.g., with G*Power or the pwr package in R). However, estimating the power for more complex models and in particular structural equation models (SEM) is not as straightforward and requires simulations. I recently came across the package paramtest (Hughes, 2017) which provides a great framework for conducting more complex power simulations. In what follows, I provide some examples of how to simulate… Read More »Estimating power for structural equation models: Simulations in R

How to do specification curve analyses in R: Introducing ‘specr’

In the last month, Michael Scharkow and I have worked on a new R-package called specr. The goal was to facilitate specification curve analyses (also called multiverse analyses). The idea behind a specification curve analysis stems from the observation that a researchers has many degrees of freedom when conducting a quantitative analysis of a data set. It starts with the question of how to operationalize the dependent and the independent variable, what model to estimate,… Read More »How to do specification curve analyses in R: Introducing ‘specr’

I started a post-doc position at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

I am excited to share with you that I started a post-doc position at the Department of Communication at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz. Moving back to Mainz is exciting and a bit nostalgic too since I started my academic career (as a young student, of course) at this very university and I have good memories of living and studying in this city. I will be working in the Dynamics of Society and Communication… Read More »I started a post-doc position at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

Reconceptualizing online privacy literacy

In recent years, online privacy literacy has often been regarded as a potential solution to people’s seemingly paradoxical behaviors in online environments. Based on empirical findings that Internet users rarely implement privacy and data protection strategies, it has been suggested that they are simply not literate enough to make informed decisions in online environments. Throughout the last years, we have been working on reconceptualizing online privacy literacy and providing reliable and validated instruments to measure online… Read More »Reconceptualizing online privacy literacy

What I read, heard and watched in 2018

When a year comes to an end, many blogger seem to have this urge to do one of these “Best of 2018” posts. The blogosphere is full of lists, thoughts, personal accomplishments and idiosyncratic meditations and resolutions. It is almost too much. Yet, I have to admit that I quite like to scroll through at least some of them, thereby realizing someone’s personal taste and likes as well as finding common themes and topics in… Read More »What I read, heard and watched in 2018

How to visualize interaction effects

I recently gave a workshop on data visualization. One of the topics was visualizing interaction effects (or “moderation” analyses). I think it is a great topic because it exemplifies quite well that there is not one solution to all problems. In general, I would argue that trying to visualize interaction effects is great idea. Due to the conditional nature of the effects obtained from standard regression analyses that include an interaction term, it is often… Read More »How to visualize interaction effects

Book published: Situational Privacy and Self-Disclosure

I finally can say that I published my dissertation. Although my defense was already in December, it took some time to wrap everything up and get the book published. But what did I actually write about? Using both a theoretical argumentation and an empirical investigation, I rationalize the view that in order to understand people’s privacy perceptions and behaviors, we need to adopt a situational perspective. To this end, the book is divided into three… Read More »Book published: Situational Privacy and Self-Disclosure