How to run IRT analyses in R

This post provides an introduction to fitting item response theory (IRT) models in R. From my experience, most scholars in the social sciences have heard about IRT as an alternative to classical test theory (and its methods such as EFA or CFA), but have never really worked with it. I believe that this is unfortunate as it offers a lot of advantages and insights into the validity and reliability of tests and items. In this… Read More »How to run IRT analyses in R

How to make most of your PhD

From my personal point of view, becoming a researcher and succeeding in a PhD program can be one of the most rewarding experiences you will have in your life. You will have a lot of freedom in deciding who you want become, what you want to learn and what exactly you want to investigate. At the same time, it can be stressful, a lot of work, and – at times – be outright frustrating. Yet,… Read More »How to make most of your PhD

ICA Preconference on “Comparative Privacy and the Literacies of a Networked Age”

The comparative privacy research network is organizing a preconference before the annual conference of the International Communication Association on May, 25th (9:30 to 17:00). Drawing on previous and ongoing conversations and collaborations, this preconference aims to attend to privacy literacy’s critical comparative nature by bringing together scholars that examine the cultural, political, and otherwise contextualized aspects of privacy literacy. The ultimate goal is to enhance conversation in communication studies about the ways in which systematic comparative cross-cultural… Read More »ICA Preconference on “Comparative Privacy and the Literacies of a Networked Age”

AoIR Satellite Event on Comparing Fuzzy Things

The Comparative Privacy Research Network is organizing a workshop on issues related to comparing fuzzy concepts like love, trust, and privacy across various structural settings (including, but not limited to cultures). Below is the description of the workshop from the CPRN website: Internet researchers often engage in the study of complex, multidimensional, and culturally sensitive ideas. Deploying such concepts in comparative research settings is critically important to knowledge advancement, yet challenging to implement in practice. This workshop… Read More »AoIR Satellite Event on Comparing Fuzzy Things

Communication journals that adopted open science principles

With more and more communication scholars adopting open science principles (e.g., preregistration, sharing of data, material, and code), also more and more media and communication journals adopt open science features and take first steps in adopting the TOP guidelines. I just quickly would like to point your attention to a very useful resource in this regard. Moritz Büchi and Tobias Dienlin started a list with peer-reviewed journals that a) focus on media and communication generally or… Read More »Communication journals that adopted open science principles

I’m joining the Department of Communication Science at the VU Amsterdam!

I am excited to share that I accepted a position as assistant professor at the Vrije Universiteit (VU) Amsterdam in the Department of Communication Science. I am thrilled to become a member of this great department and I am looking forward to work and learn together with an amazing group of scholars. At the VU, I will have colleagues whose work is characterized by the use of advanced and computational research methods and an extraordinary… Read More »I’m joining the Department of Communication Science at the VU Amsterdam!

New Publication: Can online privacy literacy support informational self-determination?

Current debates on online privacy are often rooted in liberal theory. Privacy is hence often understood as a form of freedom from social, economic, and institutional influences. Such a negative perspective on privacy, however, focuses too much on how individuals can be protected or can protect themselves instead of challenging the necessity for protection itself. Similar to treating symptoms of a disease instead of its causes, providing protection fails to acknowledge that the necessity for such… Read More »New Publication: Can online privacy literacy support informational self-determination?

New Publication: An Agenda for Open Science in Communication

In the last 10 years, many canonical findings in the social sciences appear unreliable. This so-called “replication crisis” has spurred calls for open science practices, which aim to increase the reproducibility, replicability, and generalizability of findings. Communication research is subject to many of the same challenges that have caused low replicability in other fields. As a result, I recently wrote a paper with more than 30 authors in which we propose an agenda for adopting… Read More »New Publication: An Agenda for Open Science in Communication

The problem of false positives: Antibody tests in times of Corona

A few weeks or months from now, we could have a Covid-19 test kit sent to our home. Similar to a blood sugar test for diabetics, we would prick our finger, wait for a couple of minutes, and we will know whether we are immune or not. The general idea is that this would help in lessen the social distancing restrictions because those who are immune could in principle go back to a normal life.… Read More »The problem of false positives: Antibody tests in times of Corona

Understanding exponential growth: The corona pandemic

With the news going crazy these days, I felt like there is one particularly thing that is often misunderstood. The corona virus spreads exponentially (without intervention or measures). The problem is that we – as human beings – are very bad at imagining what an exponential trend looks like. By now, many differnet graphics and figures appear everywhere that aim to visualize the amount of infections or mortality rates per country. One of the most… Read More »Understanding exponential growth: The corona pandemic